What are Furosemide 40 mg Tablets? What They are Used For?

Furosemide 40 mg tablets are used as a water pill. They are under the class of drugs called diuretics. Diuretics help in the elimination or secretion of unwanted body fluids that causes serious effects in the body. One of these serious unwanted body effects is Edema in which the furosemide 40 mg tablets are the best medication that intends to cure it. Edema is the swelling of some body parts caused by abnormal fluid formation between the interstitial spaces of some of our body tissues caused by some health conditions like high blood pressure, lung problems, heart problems, and liver problems. Furosemide 40 mg tablets works by discharging these fluids together with the urine by controlling some kidney functions. Typically, a doctor prescribes you with furosemide 40 mg tablets if you have too much water in the body. Read more…

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Canadian Medicine is the editors' news blog of , a monthly medical magazine based in Montreal, Canada. The blog editor is .

Canadian Medicine covers health news from coast to coast to coast. We also host the largest available database of Canadian physician bloggers, with over 60 doctors' blogs (see the right-hand sidebar).

Canadian Medicine was a finalist in the trade-publication blog category of the Canadian Online Publishing Awards 2009.


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Codeine article ruffles feathers

Our article on a rare case of fatal neonate codeine poisoning ("") has a group called - who promote something called Family Medicine from a Biblical World View - all fired up.

On their , the group takes exception to the idea that women should take any meds after childbirth. They also don't seem to like the idea of physicians using their clinical judgement to decide which women could safely use Tylenol 3 for post-partum pain relief:

The “experts”, as they call themselves, disagree with this mother. One of their suggestions, according to the article I cited, is for nursing mothers to continue to take the deadly Tylenol 3, and keep an eye on mom and baby.

Instead, APM Formulators urge parents to "protect yourself through the knowledge of medicinal plants that have properties for after birth pain."

One has to wonder whether the good people at APM Formulators are aware that is one of those "medicinal plants that have properties for after birth pain."

Canadian Medicine writ large

There’s never been a better time to dissect our healthcare system.

, Michael Moore’s new documentary on the state of healthcare (released today in Canada), holds us up as a model of how well universal healthcare can work. Many Canadians will experience a mix of pride and incredulity when they see it (I know I did when I saw it). But what’s certain is that seeing our system on the big screen is making us all do a little healthcare soul searching.

So we think it’s a great time for us to launch our new editors’ blog.

Every week we'll post the health stories - Canadian and international - we think are important, shocking or just just plain odd. We'll also bring you updates on stories we’ve covered in the .

We hope you enjoy it.

Happy Canada Day!

Gillian Woodford
Editor