How to Acquire Antibiotics for Sale

In the old days, no one can acquire antibiotics for sale if they do not have a doctor’s prescription for it.   Most people of those ages do think that it is rightly appropriate to first have a doctor’s prescription or at least his recommendation in order for one to be allowed to get some antibiotics for sale to treat their ailments, but today, due to modern advancements in science, health and technology, this way of thinking is now being overlooked.  The way most of us think about antibiotics today is also different, too.  When we get a bacterial infection, we would usually want to get it treated right away, and that’s what antibiotics for sale without a prescription is all about.

You may be wondering, how can one acquire antibiotics for sale without a prescription by a doctor? If you live in the United States or any similar country, then most of the times it would be difficult for you to be able to buy some antibiotics for sale right at your local pharmacy’s counter.  In reality, there is a way on how to get some antibiotics for sale even without a doctor’s prescription on hand, and there are actually 4 ways: through a pet store, take a trip to Mexico, visit an oriental/ethnic market or convenience store, or you can buy antibiotics for sale via the Internet.

If you are already a pet lover or you have a pet at home, for example, a fish, then any pharmacist will say to you that human antibiotics are usually used to treat fish diseases, and you do not need a prescription just to buy antibiotics for your pet fish.  Some antibiotics for sale available at pet stores where you do not need a prescription are: ampicillin, erythromycin, tetracycline in either tablet or capsule form. Most people would think it’s not a great idea to take vet medicines; however, in chemical form, these drugs are actually the same as what you will get from a local pharmacy meant for human use. Read more…

What's in the news: August 28

A round-up of Canadian health news, from coast to coast to coast, and beyond, for Thursday, August 28.

The Maple Leaf listeriosis outbreak persists, as the Canadian Press carries a story published in the Chronicle-Herald today under the bold (and quesionable) heading "Listeria could be re-election hazard," going so far as to compare the federal government's food-safety monitoring problems to past issues like the water contamination at Walkerton, and the financial scandals that plagued Paul Martin's Liberal minority.

The Conservatives have dropped their support for Bill C-484, the Unborn Victims of Crime Act, a private member's bill proposed by Tory MP Ken Epps that would have made it a separate crime to kill a fetus in the case of a murder of a pregnant woman. Justice Minister Rob Nicholson announced that the government plans instead to introduce legislation that would allow judges to consider pregnancy as an "aggravating factor" when sentencing convicted criminals. Mr Epps, however, says he will continue to stand behind his proposed law even though it is now doomed. Mr Epps is backed by a small group of stalwart supporters in Parliament. The Canadian Medical Association, meanwhile, was eager to take credit for the government's decision to drop C-484, in light of a motion proposed by a delegate last week at the organization's Annual Meeting. The motion opposed "... any legislation that would result in compromising access for women to the medical services required to terminate a pregnancy." [CMA News]

Quebec will not open its own safe-injection site for drug addicts, after all. Health Minister Yves Bolduc's office said last week, sounding uncannily like Tony Clement's cadre, that there isn't enough evidence yet to justify opening a facility similar to Vancouver's Insite. The announcement has angered a number of advocacy groups and public health workers, as well as the separatist opposition party, the Parti Québecois.

Should codeine be entirely removed from obstetrics wards? That's what a Vancouver perinatologist thinks after reading a study published online by U of T researcher Gideon Koren and others in Clinical Pharmacology & Therapeutics. The good doctor's outrage is late in coming, though; the "new" study simply confirms what Dr Koren has been saying for years now about the danger for some genetically predisposed women of breastfeeding while taking codeine. The case in which an infant died as a result happened back in 2005, and the National Review of Medicine covered his research last year.

Dr Gordon Guyatt, the McMaster epidemiology prof and health policy analyst known for coining the term "evidence-based medicine," is sounding more and more like a potential federal Parliamentarian* every day. *Correction: Dr Guyatt is , for the NDP in Ancaster-Dundas-Flamborough-Westdale, in Ontario, and he has run in three previous elections.
I meant to write that he is sounding more like an MP every day.

Check out the most recent edition of Health Wonk Review, featuring the best in health policy writing from the medical blogosphere. Canadian Medicine makes an appearance.