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What are Furosemide 40 mg Tablets? What They are Used For?

Furosemide 40 mg tablets are used as a water pill. They are under the class of drugs called diuretics. Diuretics help in the elimination or secretion of unwanted body fluids that causes serious effects in the body. One of these serious unwanted body effects is Edema in which the furosemide 40 mg tablets are the best medication that intends to cure it. Edema is the swelling of some body parts caused by abnormal fluid formation between the interstitial spaces of some of our body tissues caused by some health conditions like high blood pressure, lung problems, heart problems, and liver problems. Furosemide 40 mg tablets works by discharging these fluids together with the urine by controlling some kidney functions. Typically, a doctor prescribes you with furosemide 40 mg tablets if you have too much water in the body. Read more…

Suffering from administrative distress?

Fight back against paperwork-induced burnout

"I adore seeing patients, but what will drive me out of family practice eventually is the paperwork."

Sound familiar? If you spend hours each day filling out paperwork for which there’s no billing code, and if you spend your evenings and weekends completing form after endless form, and it's driving you up the wall — well, you're not alone. Recently, a team of Saskatchewan researchers set out to measure just how bad the problem has become.

In a study published In March's Canadian Journal of Psychiatry, psychiatrist David Keegan and researchers Rein Lepnurm and Wallace Lockhart measured what they called the "daily distress" of doctors. They asked physicians across the country about their professional and personal lives: anger at colleagues, frustration with demanding patients, ability to sleep soundly, whether work responsibilities interfered with home lives, etc.

The study's results (PDF) were, well, deeply distressing. According to their measures, slightly more than 50% of doctors experience very serious distress several times a month; another 37% are in distress at least once a week.

Read the rest of this article, from the June issue of Parkhurst Exchange, online here.

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1 comments:

  1. sharon7 July, 2009 11:54 AM

    RE: administrative burnout for doctors

    Considering:

    1. their own list of limitations in the report

    2. reporting " findings" is not the same as reporting solutions

    3. discussion needed on the development and ways to use an assessment tool

    4. the strange remark "“adaptive character trait of compulsiveness” . Is that in a textbook somewhere?

    Suggestion:

    Use printed clinical carepaths with checklists and comment beside each "performance' step. Add a time spent box.

    Then at some future time... use the results for the formation of a "cheat sheet' for routine visits....

    Then.. use data collected to formulate an argument for "billing changes" based on time spent ( either to funder or patient )

    Delete