Latest headlines

Loading...

Say Goodbye to Erectile Dysfunction with Tadalafil

Erectile dysfunction, abbreviated ED, and otherwise known as impotence in men, is the failure of a man to obtain and maintain an erection which is direly needed for engaging in sexual intercourse.

Erectile dysfunction is a condition that is very common in much older men.  It has been estimated that about half of all men who are within the bracket age of 40 to 70 may have ED at a certain degree.  Depending on the circumstances and on the individual himself, erectile dysfunction can also affect those who are younger, even if they are just around the age of 25 or more.

Why does ED Occur in some Men?  Erectile dysfunction causes actually vary, and they can be physically related or psychologically related.  Physical causes of ED may include hormonal issues, surgery or injury, tightening of the blood vessels that lead towards the penis which is usually linked to high cholesterol, hypertension, or diabetes.  Psychological (mental) causes of ED may include depression, anxiety or problems with relationships. Read more…

Federal jokesters mine H1N1 flu for new material

Thanks to Maclean's reporter Aaron Wherry for subjecting himself to Question Period in the House of Commons yesterday so the rest of us didn't have to. He asks that we take note of one "particularly edifying exchange":

Ms. Judy Wasylycia-Leis (Winnipeg North, NDP): Mr. Speaker, the A (H1N1) flu is expected to hit even harder in October. Some 74 people have already died from this flu virus. We need to act now. The minister plans to reveal her priority list for the flu vaccine a little later this week, but we want to know now whether first nations and Inuit people are on that list, since they are at a much greater risk. My question is very simple. Can the minister tell us whether aboriginal people are on the government's list of priorities?

Hon. Leona Aglukkaq (Minister of Health, CPC): Mr. Speaker, I want to be very clear that every Canadian who wants to receive the vaccine will receive it. The vaccine rollout is currently being developed. A special advisory committee made up of chief medical officers is working on that and I expect that vaccine rollout document to be released some time this week. We are working with the provinces and territories to ensure that all Canadians who want to receive the vaccine will be able to do so.

Ms. Judy Wasylycia-Leis (Winnipeg North, NDP): Mr. Speaker, does the minister realize that “A (H1N1)” is not a postal code? We have a serious problem on our hands. At the symposium in Winnipeg two weeks ago, leading epidemiologists in this country said that first nations and Inuit people are 25 times more likely to contract H1N1. I ask you, Mr. Speaker, is the government going to stop the bureaucratese and this dilly-dallying with respect to first nations and Inuit people and act now?

Hon. Leona Aglukkaq (Minister of Health, CPC): Mr. Speaker, the only party that thinks H1N1 is a postal code is that party. Our goal is to ensure the balance between the needs and the speed of the timing of the vaccine. We are gathering as much information as we can on the vaccine to ensure that it is safe and effective for all Canadians. Thanks to the actions of Health Canada, we will be able to approve that vaccine quickly and all Canadians who want to receive the vaccine will be able to do so.
Just in case that conversation got you wondering, we pay Members of Parliament a base salary of $157,731 a year. Ms Wasylycia-Leis, as vice-chair of the Standing Committee on Health, is entitled to an additional $5,684. Ms Aglukkaq gets an extra $75,516 for her efforts as a cabinet minister, plus a $2,122 car allowance.

When children misbehave, their parents usually take away their allowance, don't they? Sometimes Question Period makes you think the inmates are running the daycare, so to speak.

Get Canadian Medicine news by email or in an RSS reader

2 comments:

  1. Purley Quirt (aka Sharon)17 September, 2009 8:24 AM

    What's in a word?

    I like this phrase " out of the fullness of the heart....... the mouth speaks"

    ?inmates...... in a ?

    ?rollout?..... or "role call"?

    Does this phrase apply in any situation where the " good cop/bad cop" dance is performed ( like the legislature as a "?truth wrenching tool")?

    When you watch a dance long enough it is the moves that intrigue, not the dancers

    ...and a skilled eye can recognize the provocative on-and-off beat of the "tango"....

    Wonder if they will discuss the "body bag" conundrum today?....... wonder if Waterloo region will bring back their 100 body bags to the steps of the legislature?........

    ....like I said..." out of the fullness of the heart"....

    Delete
  2. drottematic19 September, 2009 3:34 AM

    "every Canadian who wants to receive the vaccine will receive it" - I don't buy it.

    I do agree with the sentiment that Wasylycia-Leis expressed. Let's get the heck on with it and lets stop it with the second-rate treatment of our aboriginal communities. There are a lot of reasons they are at increased risk for morbidity and mortality from the flu, and it sure doesn't feel good to provide sub-par care.

    I put my rant about the Canadian perspective on the flu on the 'ole blog.

    Especially check out the link to Kevin Patterson's Globe and Mail article - painful reality.

    Jess

    Delete