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Why Use Fluconazole Treatment

One of the nastiest types of infection is fungal infection.  Although they are more likely to grow on the skin, there are more serious ones though that develops in the respiratory system and infect not just the lungs, but also the blood and other parts of the body’s internal structure.  When you develop a fungal infection, it is vital that you treat the infection as soon as possible to prevent further growth, development, and spread of the infection.  Failure to do so may mean longer and costlier treatment.  Fluconazole treatment is needed for treating fungal infection.  Fluconazole treatment is an antifungal medication treatment that you take orally.

Most antifungals are applied on the skin directly to where the infection has developed.  However, if the infection has buried further or deeper in to the skin, or the infection has developed inside of the body, such topical type of antifungal will not work on such.  For cases like this, fluconazole treatment is necessary as fluconazole treatment comes in pill form which you take orally.  The treatment process in using fluconazole treatment is the purging of the infection from the inside of your body.  This effectively gets rid of the infection from your system.

For antifungal fluconazole treatment, it is necessary that you use fluconazole treatment for a course of several days.  The number of days you need to use fluconazole treatment depends on the type of infection that you have developed and the severity that it has.  Course treatment is necessary in completely getting rid of an infection from the body.  This is the very reason why doctors prescribe patients with several days of use of fluconazole treatment when they have a fungal infection.  By completing the course of fluconazole treatment, you will be able to completely purge the fungal infection out of the body. Read more…

THE INTERVIEW: Dr Bonnie Henry, H1N1 flu fighter

In this month's issue of Parkhurst Exchange, which should be arriving on physicians' desks across the country right about now, you'll find a short Q&A with Dr Bonnie Henry (right), the BC Centre for Disease Control’s director of Public Health Emergency Management the author of the new book Soap and Water & Common Sense: The Definitive Guide to Viruses, Bacteria, Parasites, and Disease (Anansi).

Online, you can read the full version of the interview, in which we discuss the severity of this pandemic, the steps family physicians can take to make their waiting rooms safer, special billing codes for H1N1 flu consults, and the interesting and pertinent story behind how Canada decided to manufacture its own vaccines after the 1976 swine flu, among other things.

Click here to read the full interview.


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