Fluconazole 150mg – Your Best Way in Treating Fungal Infections

Fluconazole 150mg is a medication that is used in treating fungal infections of certain types.  Fluconazole 150mg treats fungal infection by killing the fungi itself.  This medication is used for a multitude of infections.  Additionally, fluconazole 150mg can be used in preventing fungal infection on people whose immune system is compromised.

Fungal infections are not always limited to the skin wherein you can treat them using antifungal creams.  Also, there are times that some skin infections cannot be treated using creams alone as some of the components of the fungus may have buried themselves already deep in your skin which is why the use of medications like fluconazole 150mg is necessary in order to fully purge them.

If you are using fluconazole 150mg, it is important that you keep this medicine for yourself and never share it with others.  Fluconazole 150mg is a prescription medication which means this has likely been prescribed to you.  Sharing the medication with others whose condition or allergic reaction has not been established can be particularly risky which is why it is highly suggested to keep your dosing of fluconazole 150mg to yourself.  Read more…

What's in the news: Feb. 16 -- Did wait times cause Toronto subway assault?


Hospital wait times may have triggered TTC attacker
A man who shoved two teenagers in front of a Toronto subway car last Friday claimed he had been waiting for care at a hospital for 12 hours before he gave up and left. A source told The Globe and Mail, whose editor's son was one of the two teens, both of whom managed to avoid being killed by the train, that the man was being treated for depression with antidepressants.

The man accused of pushing the boys, Adenir DeOliveira, has been ordered by a court to undergo psychiatric evaluation. "... I want to know if there were cracks in the system that led to this," said The Globe's editor-in-chief, Edward Greenspon. "All of us need to be concerned with the public safety aspect of this. I have questions about that which I hope will be answered as the investigation continues."

Methadone users protest
Methadone users protested outside the offices of the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Ontario last week. They complained of a "double standard" for methadone patients, who are required to give personal information to the college. Dr Philip Berger joined the patients in the protest. He has filed complaints with the province's human rights and privacy commissions. "The college is supposed to regulate doctors, not patients," he said. "Imagine going to see your doctor for high blood pressure or diabetes and the doctor says, 'Before giving you this medication, you've got to sign a form agreeing to give this (personal) information to a licensing body.'" [Toronto Star]

An eager pharma company
The pharma company Janssen-Ortho has applied to Health Canada to have their new drug to prevent premature ejaculation approved. The drug, dapoxetine, was denied approval by the US Food and Drug Administration in 2005, but the regulator's reasoning hasn't been released.

Point-counterpoint
Direct-to-consumer drug advertising is good, wrote Durhane Wong-Rieger. [Canadian Family Physician]

No, it's bad, argued Barbara Mintzes. [Canadian Family Physician]

Missing med students found
Two University of Ottawa med students were located by a search and rescue team after they became lost for two days while hiking in New Hampshire.

Ouch!
Health Canada warned of counterfeit toothbrushes, which, terrifyingly, could leave dislodged bristles stuck in your throat. [Health Canada advisory]

"Super-Bugged"
Stéphanie Verge recounted her nosocomial MRSA infection in an article for Toronto Life. "I was one of the estimated 250,000 people a year in Canada who leave the hospital with a new infection—acquired, more often than not, because of unsanitary conditions. Patients check in to hospitals making a silent pact with those who work there that they will leave healthier than when they arrived. Showing up for a routine surgery and exiting with a potentially deadly infection is not part of the agreement."

Canadian-trained doc arrested for rape
Dr Peter L Chi, a Canadian-educated plastic surgeon in California, has been arrested and charged with eight sex crimes, including rape by a foreign object and sexual assault. According to police, a total of 32 women have complained about Dr Chi. He turned in his medical licence. Read the criminal complaint.

Paying for US health reform
Massachusetts Democratic Congressman Barney Frank argued in an essay in The Nation that the question of where to find funding for health reform is not nearly as complex as it's been made out to be: just cut the outrageous amount of money spent on defence.

Photo: Spadina subway station (Toronto), Shutterstock