Are You Going to Use Finasteride for Hair Loss? Read This First

Sold in the market under the brand names Propecia and Proscar, finasteride is a medication that is intended to treat people who are suffering from hair loss.  In the early days, finasteride was just like other medications that were originally used to treat benign prostatic hypertrophy and prostate cancer. It turns out that patients who took finasteride for their prostate-related issues had experienced great results with it, along with a surprising bonus, and that is, the growth of hair.

Finasteride actually works by means of inhibiting or stopping type II 5-alpha reductase, the enzyme responsible for converting the hormone testosterone into dihydrotestosterone (DHT).  DHT, in turn, is the one responsible for losing one’s hair, resulting to baldness if not remedied.  Thus, simply put, the action of finasteride is to prevent the conversion of testosterone into DHT, and the end result would be the prevention of hair loss. This “favorable side effect” of preventing hair loss and promoting growth of new hair by finasteride is what made it famous in the pharmaceutical world, not by its primary use which is for treating benign prostatic hypertrophy and other prostate-related ailments. Read more…

More health mininster churn as Newfoundland's Wiseman swapped out

Ross Wiseman, the man who presided over the Newfoundland and Labrador health ministry during the Eastern Health regional authority's infamous cover-up of thousands of breast cancer hormone testing errors, has been removed from his post in Premier Danny Williams's latest cabinet shuffle.

Mr Wiseman will take over as minister of business for Paul Oram, who now becomes the province's new health minister.

Mr Wiseman, who served as parliamantary secretary for health from 2003 until his appointment as minister of health in 2007, was a frequent target of opposition politicians (who seldom let much time pass before renewing calls for his resignation) as well as many of the province's physicians, particularly specialists upset about the government's collective-agreement negotiating tactics over the last two years.

The new minister, Paul Oram (right), began his entrepreneurial career in construction and funeral homes. He's of having a conflict of interests in his new role as minister of health, because he owns part of two personal care homes in Newfoundland.

This year has seen a great deal of what is sometimes called "ministerial churn" among health ministers across the country. The churn really began late last year when the federal government named a new cabinet after October's election, replacing Tony Clement with Leona Aglukkaq. Since then, there have been health minister changes in New Brunswick (Mike Murphy out, Mary Schryer in), British Columbia (George Abbott out, Kevin Falcon in), Nova Scotia (Karen Casey out, Maureen MacDonald in), and now in Newfoundland and Labrador.

There could be more churn yet. It seemed likely a couple of months ago that Ontario's David Caplan would be on his way out as details emerged about eHealth Ontario consulting contracts that were given without open bidding. Premier Dalton McGuinty has stood by his man so far, however.