Learn about Erectile Dysfunction and Sildenafil Citrate Online

Have you ever wondered how sildenafil acts within your body to help you solve your problems with erectile dysfunction?  Thanks to the instant availability of the Internet and computer devices, you will now be able to learn about ED and sildenafil citrate online right at your fingertips.

If you are curious as to how PDE5 inhibitors such as sildenafil work inside your body, then you can browse on search engines by simply typing in the search box the words sildenafil citrate online.  When you read about the mechanics of the action of sildenafil citrate online, you will learn that it helps protect the enzyme cGMP (short for cyclic guanosine monophosphate) from being degraded by the cGMP-specific PDE5 (short for phosphodiesterase type 5 enzyme) which are evidently located in the penile corpus cavernosum of men.  The free radical NO (short for nitric oxide) found in the penile corpus cavernosum adheres itself to what are called the guanylate cyclase receptors, which then results to the occurrence of elevated amounts of cGMP, thereby leading to the vasodilation or relaxation of the smooth muscles of the inner lining cushions of the helicine arteries (tendril-like arteries of the penis importantly involved in the process of its erection).  Once the smooth muscles relax, it will result to vasodilation and therefore there will be an increased supply of blood flowing into the penile spongy tissue, and the end result would be a successful penile erection.

Additionally, what you would also learn about sildenafil citrate online is that its special molecular makeup is somewhat similar to cGMP (located in the penile corpus cavernosum as well) and functions as an aggressive binding element of PDE5 in the penile corpus cavernosum, which results to more concentrations of cGMP and even better occurrences of erections. Avery important information that men will learn through reading about sildenafil citrate online is that sildenafil will be rendered useless without the introduction of one or more sexual stimuli, since only a sexual stimulus will be the only factor that can initiate the activation of the nitric oxide and cGMP inside a man’s body. Read more…

What's in the news: Oct. 1 -- Gay man takes on blood-donor ban

Gay man takes on blood-donor ban
A gay blood donor has begun a major and potentially majorly consequential legal battle with Canadian Blood Services over their prohibition on male homosexual donations. CBS is suing Kyle Freeman of Thornhill, Ontario, for lying about his status as an eligible donor and for donating blood in violation of its rules, and Mr Freeman is suing CBS, alleging their policy banning gay men from being donors is a violation of his Charter rights.

Unpublished data dictate Canadian flu-vaccine policy
Most provinces are now suspending their seasonal-flu vaccination programs after word circulated of several as-yet-unpublished Canadian studies that reportedly found the seasonal vaccine raises the risk of contracting the pandemic H1N1 strain. Only New Brunswick has committed to distributing seasonal vaccine, reported The Globe and Mail. [Globe and Mail]

Military considers requiring H1N1-flu vaccine
The Canadian Forces is worried about the legality of mandating the H1N1-flu vaccine for its soldiers. [CTV News]

OMA lobbies against pharmacists prescribing
At a legislative committee hearing on Tuesday, the Ontario Medical Association issued a salvo in its push back against the Ontario government's proposal to permit pharmacists to prescribe some drugs and renew some scripts. "The number one priority for Ontario's doctors throughout this entire process has been and remains patient safety because the level and quality of care that a doctor can provide should not be substituted for expediency," President-elect Dr Mark MacLeod said in a release. [OMA news release]

Report cards are in
The Conference Board of Canada ranked Canada 10th out of 16 developed countries on its healthcare systems, giving it a 'B' grade. The United States ranked 16th, with a 'D.' [Conference Board of Canada report]

Asklepios hits 3,000 members
The Canadian Medical Association's online social network has 3,000 members a little over one year after its launch.

Drugs bought online kill drug researcher
A Canadian neurobiology post-doc working in Maryland is to face criminal charges after his girlfriend died from a buprenorphine overdose as a result of recreational use of what may have been tainted drugs that were acquired from overseas via the internet.

What's in the news: Sep. 28 -- Who gets treated first in a pandemic?


Who goes first?
Hamilton Health Sciences announces Canada's first priority-treatment plan for the H1N1 flu pandemic. According to The Spectator, the priority list is as follows:

1. Health-care workers and other essential services such as firefighters and police officers because they have the skills to save others once they're better.

2. Those who caught the flu at work, particularly essential service workers, because they put themselves at risk to save others.

3. Caregivers of children, disabled adults or the elderly to minimize societal disruption.

4. Young people because they haven't had a chance to live their lives yet.

5. Those most likely to survive that particular strain of flu.
An HIV vaccine or another dashed hope?
Thai researchers announced encouraging results from a set of HIV-vaccine trials. The combo-vaccine that was being tested proved effective in 31% of patients, and many experts were cautious in expressing optimism about the first-ever positive results in an HIV-vaccine trial. [Globe and Mail]

No flu shots until puzzle resolved
Ontario health officials said they would delay distributing regular flu shots because as-yet-unpublished research has indicated that the regular flu shot may raise the risk of contracting the H1N1 flu. [CTV News]

NB finally fills trauma chief job
The province of New Brunswick has hired Dr Marcel Martin, a surgeon from Sherbrooke, Quebec, to run its trauma-care system, after an interminably long period in which no progress was made on trying to hire someone for the job.

Alberta political shakeup to come?
The right-wing Wildrose Alliance party could pick up as many as 10 Progressive Conservative defectors if leadership candidate Danielle Smith wins the primary election, the Edmonton Journal's Trish Audette reported. That would dramatically alter the provincial political scene, which has been dominated by the Tories since the Mesozoic Era or thereabouts. And as complaints about the size and nature of government spending on healthcare continue to plague the Stelmach government from the left, the right and the centre, it seems fair to say that the province's divisive health reform being ushered in by Health Minister Ron Liepert may be playing a big part in voters' disillusionment with the Conservatives. Then again, maybe it's just that oil and gas tax revenues are down. When the price of oil rises again, voters may forget their complaints about the Tories' management.

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