How to Acquire Antibiotics for Sale

In the old days, no one can acquire antibiotics for sale if they do not have a doctor’s prescription for it.   Most people of those ages do think that it is rightly appropriate to first have a doctor’s prescription or at least his recommendation in order for one to be allowed to get some antibiotics for sale to treat their ailments, but today, due to modern advancements in science, health and technology, this way of thinking is now being overlooked.  The way most of us think about antibiotics today is also different, too.  When we get a bacterial infection, we would usually want to get it treated right away, and that’s what antibiotics for sale without a prescription is all about.

You may be wondering, how can one acquire antibiotics for sale without a prescription by a doctor? If you live in the United States or any similar country, then most of the times it would be difficult for you to be able to buy some antibiotics for sale right at your local pharmacy’s counter.  In reality, there is a way on how to get some antibiotics for sale even without a doctor’s prescription on hand, and there are actually 4 ways: through a pet store, take a trip to Mexico, visit an oriental/ethnic market or convenience store, or you can buy antibiotics for sale via the Internet.

If you are already a pet lover or you have a pet at home, for example, a fish, then any pharmacist will say to you that human antibiotics are usually used to treat fish diseases, and you do not need a prescription just to buy antibiotics for your pet fish.  Some antibiotics for sale available at pet stores where you do not need a prescription are: ampicillin, erythromycin, tetracycline in either tablet or capsule form. Most people would think it’s not a great idea to take vet medicines; however, in chemical form, these drugs are actually the same as what you will get from a local pharmacy meant for human use. Read more…

WHO growth charts replace US charts as gold standard

The way we keep track of kids' height and weight is changing.

The Canadian Paediatic Society and the College of Family Physicians of Canada have signed on to a new policy statement (PDF) endorsing the WHO's revised growth charts rather than the American CDC growth charts that have long been in use in this country. The new policy is also published in the February issue of the journal Paediatrics & Child Health.

On the Canadian Paediatric Society's website you can find more information, including a health professional's guide to using the WHO growth charts, a fact sheet for parents, and (soon) copies of the WHO charts specifically designed for Canadian doctors.

What was wrong with the CDC growth charts? Basically, they were outdated: their data were based on the assumption that most babies are fed formula, which may have been true 40 years ago but is not today. In a May 2009 column in Parkhurst Exchange magazine, Dr Richard Haber, an associate professor of pediatrics at McGill University and the Director of the Pediatric Consultation Centre at the Montreal Children’s Hospital, explained the CDC charts' problems:

"The revised [CDC] charts don’t necessarily represent optimal growth in infancy as the population data sets represent periods when most babies were bottle-fed; since 1970, only about 50% of infants were breastfed and of these merely 30% for greater than three months. What’s important to remember is that exclusively breastfed babies will plot higher for their weight in the first 6 months and lower for weight in the 6-12 month period. So they may appear to ‘fall off’ their curve. One other disadvantage is that the CDC curves represent cross-sectional data sets based on chronological age and not pubertal stage, and therefore don’t take into account the pubertal growth spurt."
Visit the PE website to read the rest of Dr Haber's May 2009 column, "," and its June 2009 follow-up on spotting red flags in growth data, "."

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