What are Furosemide 40 mg Tablets? What They are Used For?

Furosemide 40 mg tablets are used as a water pill. They are under the class of drugs called diuretics. Diuretics help in the elimination or secretion of unwanted body fluids that causes serious effects in the body. One of these serious unwanted body effects is Edema in which the furosemide 40 mg tablets are the best medication that intends to cure it. Edema is the swelling of some body parts caused by abnormal fluid formation between the interstitial spaces of some of our body tissues caused by some health conditions like high blood pressure, lung problems, heart problems, and liver problems. Furosemide 40 mg tablets works by discharging these fluids together with the urine by controlling some kidney functions. Typically, a doctor prescribes you with furosemide 40 mg tablets if you have too much water in the body. Read more…

Patients who disappear


It's 11:30 am, do you know how to reach your patients? You may think you do but the reality may be quite different. The use of cell phones, combined with the recession have played havoc with many patient record files. The contact numbers are often obsolete.

It goes like this:

1) Patient suffers loss of income

2) Patient cancels land line

3) Patient uses cell

4) Patient looses cell (or can't afford the charges)

5) Patient can't be found.

Dr Perri Klass, a New York physician, noticed an unexpected jump in the head-size of a at the three-month check up. Problem was it made the observation in review the file. After reviewing the case he feared hydrocephalus and other congenital brain malfunctions. He wanted the baby to come back into for a closer look but was unable to contact the baby's mother. None of the phone numbers in her file worked. Eventually he tracked her down through a sister. The child came in and was found to be perfectly healthy. The incident gave the doctor pause.

The lesson: check phone numbers every time a patient comes in. Even then you may find yourself marking too many patient files "lost to followup."

Dr Klass's full article can be found in the April 15 issue of New England Journal of Medicine. NEJM.org

2 comments:

said...

The article is very interesting & true, I really like it, now a day’s is very expensive.

said...

Great points noticed.Good to know of it.