Say Goodbye to Erectile Dysfunction with Tadalafil

Erectile dysfunction, abbreviated ED, and otherwise known as impotence in men, is the failure of a man to obtain and maintain an erection which is direly needed for engaging in sexual intercourse.

Erectile dysfunction is a condition that is very common in much older men.  It has been estimated that about half of all men who are within the bracket age of 40 to 70 may have ED at a certain degree.  Depending on the circumstances and on the individual himself, erectile dysfunction can also affect those who are younger, even if they are just around the age of 25 or more.

Why does ED Occur in some Men?  Erectile dysfunction causes actually vary, and they can be physically related or psychologically related.  Physical causes of ED may include hormonal issues, surgery or injury, tightening of the blood vessels that lead towards the penis which is usually linked to high cholesterol, hypertension, or diabetes.  Psychological (mental) causes of ED may include depression, anxiety or problems with relationships. Read more…

Patients who disappear


It's 11:30 am, do you know how to reach your patients? You may think you do but the reality may be quite different. The use of cell phones, combined with the recession have played havoc with many patient record files. The contact numbers are often obsolete.

It goes like this:

1) Patient suffers loss of income

2) Patient cancels land line

3) Patient uses cell

4) Patient looses cell (or can't afford the charges)

5) Patient can't be found.

Dr Perri Klass, a New York physician, noticed an unexpected jump in the head-size of a at the three-month check up. Problem was it made the observation in review the file. After reviewing the case he feared hydrocephalus and other congenital brain malfunctions. He wanted the baby to come back into for a closer look but was unable to contact the baby's mother. None of the phone numbers in her file worked. Eventually he tracked her down through a sister. The child came in and was found to be perfectly healthy. The incident gave the doctor pause.

The lesson: check phone numbers every time a patient comes in. Even then you may find yourself marking too many patient files "lost to followup."

Dr Klass's full article can be found in the April 15 issue of New England Journal of Medicine. NEJM.org

2 comments:

said...

The article is very interesting & true, I really like it, now a day’s is very expensive.

said...

Great points noticed.Good to know of it.