Say Goodbye to Erectile Dysfunction with Tadalafil

Erectile dysfunction, abbreviated ED, and otherwise known as impotence in men, is the failure of a man to obtain and maintain an erection which is direly needed for engaging in sexual intercourse.

Erectile dysfunction is a condition that is very common in much older men.  It has been estimated that about half of all men who are within the bracket age of 40 to 70 may have ED at a certain degree.  Depending on the circumstances and on the individual himself, erectile dysfunction can also affect those who are younger, even if they are just around the age of 25 or more.

Why does ED Occur in some Men?  Erectile dysfunction causes actually vary, and they can be physically related or psychologically related.  Physical causes of ED may include hormonal issues, surgery or injury, tightening of the blood vessels that lead towards the penis which is usually linked to high cholesterol, hypertension, or diabetes.  Psychological (mental) causes of ED may include depression, anxiety or problems with relationships. Read more…

New fibrage-statin combos work their way through the system


The FDA is looking for more data to support a new US drug application for a product called Certriad which combines two cholesterol meds -- Abbott's TriLipix and AstraZeneca's Crestor.

TriLipix is a class of drugs called fibrages that boost "good" cholesterol and reduce triglycerides, a fat found in the blood stream, and "bad" cholesterol. Crestor is a statin that raises "good" HDL cholesterol while reducing "bad" HDL cholesterol.

The new product is intended to treat dyslipikemia, which results from elevated cholesterol and triglycerides. More than 100 million Americans suffer from the disorder says The American Heart Association.

The companies will continue to work with the FDA.

Studies on the effectiveness of statins in the prevention of cardiovascular disease are ongoing. One of many was reported in Journal Watch Cardiology last August by Dr Harlan Krumholz It results came from of an analysis of 10 trials with over 70,000 subjects over an average of 4 years, mean age 63, mean baseline LDL level 140, 2/3rds were male., ¼ of those had diabetes. Mortality was 5.7% in the control groups and 5.1% in the statin group. Go to http://bit.ly/bqbdnc for more.

The study concluded that statins can reduce the risk of cardiovascular events in those without cardiovascular disease.

Lowering heart attack and stroke the Mayan/Aztec way

On a recent visit to Santa Fe, New Mexico, was taken to a café that serves nothing but hot chocolate drinks. Most of them are derived from original recipes from South and Central America. The most popular beverage on the menu was the Mexican Full Spice Elixir. The only sweetener used is algave, and that extremely sparingly. Delicious and unusual.

The Kakawa Café may be onto something. Fully 39 % of the 20,000 participants in a just published German study who ate six grams (the equivalent of a single square from a chocolate bar) lowered their risk of heart attack and stroke. Researchers believe it's flavonols in chocolate widen blood vessels leading to a drop in blood pressure.

Though the study makes no dietary recommendations, a small square of dark chocolate makes a good replacement for snacks high in sugar, salt and fat, says Brian Buijsse, the lead author.

The enphasis is on the "small" size of the amount ingested. Eating large amounts of chocolate would result in weight gain that would be far worse than any benefits from the extra flavonols. A 100 grams of chocolate contains 500 calories.

The study was published today in the European Heart Journal