How to Acquire Antibiotics for Sale

In the old days, no one can acquire antibiotics for sale if they do not have a doctor’s prescription for it.   Most people of those ages do think that it is rightly appropriate to first have a doctor’s prescription or at least his recommendation in order for one to be allowed to get some antibiotics for sale to treat their ailments, but today, due to modern advancements in science, health and technology, this way of thinking is now being overlooked.  The way most of us think about antibiotics today is also different, too.  When we get a bacterial infection, we would usually want to get it treated right away, and that’s what antibiotics for sale without a prescription is all about.

You may be wondering, how can one acquire antibiotics for sale without a prescription by a doctor? If you live in the United States or any similar country, then most of the times it would be difficult for you to be able to buy some antibiotics for sale right at your local pharmacy’s counter.  In reality, there is a way on how to get some antibiotics for sale even without a doctor’s prescription on hand, and there are actually 4 ways: through a pet store, take a trip to Mexico, visit an oriental/ethnic market or convenience store, or you can buy antibiotics for sale via the Internet.

If you are already a pet lover or you have a pet at home, for example, a fish, then any pharmacist will say to you that human antibiotics are usually used to treat fish diseases, and you do not need a prescription just to buy antibiotics for your pet fish.  Some antibiotics for sale available at pet stores where you do not need a prescription are: ampicillin, erythromycin, tetracycline in either tablet or capsule form. Most people would think it’s not a great idea to take vet medicines; however, in chemical form, these drugs are actually the same as what you will get from a local pharmacy meant for human use. Read more…

Minister Matthews wouldn't "...call them kickbacks…but there are people who would."


"Allowances" given Ontario to pharmacists by generic drug companies are to be eliminated said the province's health minister Deb Matthews on Wednesday.

The idea is that the annual $750 million "subsidy" is to be used to pay for services to patients but even the pharmacists concede that 70% of the money is treated as rebates to fund operations and hike profits. Ms Matthews suggests ending the practice could reduce the cost of generics by half. To compensate, the minister suggested that the government will increase dispensing fees by $1 -- to a total of $150 million to offset the reduction.

Donnie Edwards, a pharmacist in Ridgeway, Ontario thinks not:

"When you take $3 out and put $1 back in... I don't think so. These dollars were used for professional services that pharmacists do everyday, in every town in this provinces"

Research based pharmaceutical companies support the change. Russell Williams, president of Rx&D, the companies' association, said: "As partners in the health care system, we want to work with the government and health care providers to ensure that patients have access to the most appropriate treatment… through timely access to innovative medicines and vaccines… ."

(For more go to )



iPad: Elegant. Fun. Seductive. Frustrating. Coming to Canada April 23




I've tested the new iPad and found it irresistible.The touch screen is marvellous to use. Smooth as butter (wipe after using), intuitive as your fingers, clear bright images. Fast, very fast.

Out of the box, there's not much to it -- looks like a big iTouch. There's a USB cord to plug it into a computer and that's it. Once you'd done that and downloaded the most recent version of iTunes, you're good to go.

The first impression is that it really is just a big, version of the iTouch -- with a book store. This is clearly Apple's challenge to e-books, Kindle, Sony, the Nook and all those yet to come. To get you started, there's a free copy of Winnie-the-Pooh which looks just about as good sitting on it's virtual wooden book shelf as it did when you were six years old and were given a fresh copy by your Grannie. Take it down an give it a flip thru, you won't be disappointed. The coloured pictures are lush, the type crystal clear.

The iTunes store offers a stack of new apps for the iPad from the games to the Wall Street Journal. The latter opens instantly and gives you a pared down version of the paper, like the NYTimes, it's free. There's music and movies to sample, buy or rent, e-mail, a calendar, contacts, notes, maps and YouTube.

Using the device for work is not quite as easy. You'll want to buy the wireless keybaord for starters. Then, you have to download iWork which consists of a word processor, a spreadsheet and presentation software. Each cost $9.99 US. You can e-mail your creations or upload them to the iWork website and then invite others to see them there if you and they wish. It's finicky and ties you firmly to Apple as Mr Jobs intends.

What it can't do or doesn't have: a camera, a phone, a usb connection for anything but itunes, flash video, multi-tasking, copying between programs, say, word processor to Safari, which, incidentally, is the only browser iPad uses.

What it does have: battery life of 10+ hours; the ability to mesmerize. iPad makes you wish you could use it for all your computing needs -- you can't.