Propecia Generic For Male Pattern Baldness

The drug propecia generic was originally intended for treating prostate enlargement or benign prostatic hyperplasia. When its branded name Proscar was released in the market, it was noticed that men who were suffering from androgenic alopecia were also being treated by the drug.  It was then that the manufacturer took notice and created some clinical studies and found out that Proscar, which came at 5mg, which at lowered dosage, particularly 1mg, could help fight androgenic alopecia.  Several years later, the brand Propecia, an offshoot of the drug Proscar was approved by the Food and Drug Administration as a treatment for androgenic alopecia.

Who is propecia generic intended for?

Propecia generic is meant for men suffering from male pattern baldness and want to stop the progression of their hair loss.  Signs of male pattern baldness would be the thinning of hair on the front, the receding of hairline on the temples, and the formation of a bald spot on the crown.  In due time, this type of baldness will let you end up bald from top to front with a rim of hair at the sides and back.  propecia generic is effective against this type of hair loss because it is able to treat it at the root of the cause – the formation of the hormone dihydrotestosterone (DHT).  Basically, this hair loss treatment prevents your hair loss from getting any worse.  If your hair loss is due to androgenic alopecia, then this is the medication for you.  Consult your doctor to know what type of hair loss you are having. Read more…

Ask pregnant women if they’d like a drink

But be sure to ask nicely

Canada may be a little short of babies, but it’s got plenty of alcohol. Keeping the two separate has mostly been the task of GPs. But the Society of Obstetricians and Gynecologists of Canada says they’re falling short. Many pregnant women who drink are missed, says the SOGC, often because physicians are unwilling to ask questions about alcohol.

Doctors who don’t make alcohol use a routine question on all visits may be particularly unwilling to suddenly raise the issue during pregnancy, given the stigma associated with mothers who drink. And even those who do raise it may not be getting honest answers.

“Many physicians don’t even ask the question,” says Gideon Koren, director of the . “It’s not an easy thing to ask. We have a sad reality that physicians and other health professionals are not doing their job on that — namely that a lot of women are not asked and we do not identify the cases. At the end are kids who are very heavily affected.”

Dr Koren sat on an SOGC panel that has just issued new guidelines on alcohol screening in pregnancy. The guidelines offer an interesting snapshot of female drinking in Canada. Did you know that richer, more educated women, while less prone to binge drinking, are more likely to consume alcohol on a daily basis? Or that Quebec has the highest number of frequent women drinkers, by a wide margin? And where can you find the highest proportion of female teetotalers? You’d never guess – it’s Nunavut.

The SOGC takes a nuanced position on abstinence, recognizing that there’s just not enough evidence on the effects of low-level consumption. Essentially, the guidelines suggest you recommend abstinence in cases where you think you can make it stick, but avoid an all-or-nothing approach if you think it will scare the patient away.

Not scaring the patient away is the key thing in alcohol screening. While a record of maternal alcohol use has proven health benefits for the infant with a fetal alcohol spectrum disorder, its benefit to the mother is far less clear – it can lead to them losing custody of their kids and they know it.

A reliable lab test for long-term alcohol use is on the way, but it requires a six-inch lock of hair, and the SOGC acknowledges – perhaps a little wistfully – that it can’t really be applied to most patients. So we have to make do with self-reporting, and in that game, you catch more flies with honey.

Don’t ask patients how often they “use alcohol”, but instead enquire how frequently they “enjoy a drink”. Don’t tell them that by drinking they may have harmed their baby, but instead emphasize how cutting alcohol could help the baby’s health.

Don’t lowball. When prompting the patient on how many drinks she consumes a week, suggest a high number, because if you suggest a low one, the patient will be reluctant to incur your disapproval by admitting she drinks more than that.

While a warm, informal approach is generally best, validated alcohol dependence questionnaires like CRAFFT and TWEAK are useful. They avoid stigma because the patient tends to assume they’re routinely given in all pregnancies. (Or you could try our non-validated WYLAB questionnaire, which identifies at-risk patients with just one question: “Would you like a beer?”)

However you screen, the effort will pay dividends, says Dr Koren, who notes that 40% of pregnancies with high alcohol consumption result in a fetal alcohol spectrum disorder. About 3% of Canadian children are born with such a condition, with effects ranging from reduced IQ to violent aggression. In fact, says Koren, about half the inmates of Canada’s prisons are the offspring of hard-drinking mothers.
Owen Dyer

Listening in to brain chatter


A microchip will soon be wedded to human neurons

It looks like Canadian researchers are at the threshold of a scientific breakthrough that may pave the way to better meds and superior control of artificial limbs.

Dr. Naweed Syed, a neurobiologist at the University of Calgary, was part of the team that wowed the international scientific world six years ago by successfully fusing mollusc brain cells (in this case pond snails) with a one-millimeter square silicon chip. Now he’s at it again. Dr. Syed, who heads cell biology and anatomy at the U of C, intends to marry human neurons this time around – taken from the brain tissue of a patient undergoing surgery for epilepsy – with the silicon-polymer chip (Biomedical Microdevices).

This will be another step towards being able to not only “listen in on conversations” between synaptic connections as well as ion channels but may lead to more accurate use of drugs. “It means we can track subtle changes in brain activity at the level of ion channels and synaptic potentials, which are also the most suitable target sites for drug development in neurodegenerative diseases and neuropsychological disorders,” says Dr. Syed, who works out of a lab at the U of C's Hotchkiss Brain Institute. The research is also being supported by the National Research Council.

The prototype biochip in its new, more refined state will record messages of excitation and inhibition between neurons. It will also allow for communication between computers and itself. This could mean that future hybrid chips might operate protheses, help improve sight or language after a stroke, and repair malfunctioning neurons for those with Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s disease.

The current chip is automated, making its use quick and easy, unlike the previous version, but 750 reuseable chips currently cost $300,000 – a definite deterrent for anyone planning to use them to build an Bionic Man.

Milena Katz