Learn about Erectile Dysfunction and Sildenafil Citrate Online

Have you ever wondered how sildenafil acts within your body to help you solve your problems with erectile dysfunction?  Thanks to the instant availability of the Internet and computer devices, you will now be able to learn about ED and sildenafil citrate online right at your fingertips.

If you are curious as to how PDE5 inhibitors such as sildenafil work inside your body, then you can browse on search engines by simply typing in the search box the words sildenafil citrate online.  When you read about the mechanics of the action of sildenafil citrate online, you will learn that it helps protect the enzyme cGMP (short for cyclic guanosine monophosphate) from being degraded by the cGMP-specific PDE5 (short for phosphodiesterase type 5 enzyme) which are evidently located in the penile corpus cavernosum of men.  The free radical NO (short for nitric oxide) found in the penile corpus cavernosum adheres itself to what are called the guanylate cyclase receptors, which then results to the occurrence of elevated amounts of cGMP, thereby leading to the vasodilation or relaxation of the smooth muscles of the inner lining cushions of the helicine arteries (tendril-like arteries of the penis importantly involved in the process of its erection).  Once the smooth muscles relax, it will result to vasodilation and therefore there will be an increased supply of blood flowing into the penile spongy tissue, and the end result would be a successful penile erection.

Additionally, what you would also learn about sildenafil citrate online is that its special molecular makeup is somewhat similar to cGMP (located in the penile corpus cavernosum as well) and functions as an aggressive binding element of PDE5 in the penile corpus cavernosum, which results to more concentrations of cGMP and even better occurrences of erections. Avery important information that men will learn through reading about sildenafil citrate online is that sildenafil will be rendered useless without the introduction of one or more sexual stimuli, since only a sexual stimulus will be the only factor that can initiate the activation of the nitric oxide and cGMP inside a man’s body. Read more…

Not out of the woods yet

Last year, Canada saw the biggest increase in new physicians in 20 years. About 2,700 extra practitioners brought the national total to around 68,000, according to figures released by CIHI, the Canadian Institute for Health Information.

Most of the new physicians, about 2,300, were graduates of Canadian medical schools. A few more doctors returned to Canada than went abroad in 2009, perhaps partly due to the weakening of the US dollar. And about 300 new doctors were international medical graduates.

Until about 2004, the number of physicians was barely keeping pace with the rising population. From 2004 to 2008, the rate of increase in physicians was double that of the general population. The 2009 increase was three times faster than the rate of increase of the population.

Clearly, steps are being taken to address Canada’s chronic physician shortage. But a crunch is still coming, and this may not be enough to divert it.

For the first time in decades, the average age of physicians didn’t increase in 2009. But it didn’t decrease either, hovering at 49.7 years. Is there any other job on earth where the average age is 50? Maybe being a nun. Meanwhile, the population ages apace. Older patients mean greater need, older doctors mean less provision.

This is not to suggest that older doctors work less. On the contrary, many do longer hours than their younger colleagues. And many are delaying retirement. Quite a few may have been burned in the stock market collapse, and the 2009 figures may partly reflect their decision to work a few more years to replenish the retirement fund. Others aren’t retiring simply because they can’t find a replacement to take on their patients. Of physicians aged 70-79 in 2004, most were still working in 2008, a feat of endurance surely unmatched in any other profession.

But retirement must come eventually. And with an average professional age of 50, the numbers leaving are going to be significant.

At the same time, their young replacements appear to be working shorter hours. Doctors today want a life as well as a career. And the dramatic increase in female doctors means more family responsibilities – women doctors average about 8 hours less work per week. They have also proved more likely, in the past, to drop the profession altogether. Of the new class of 2009, 52% of general practitioners and 45% of specialists were women.

(Ratios of women to men, strangely, vary quite sharply from one province to another. In Quebec, for example, the numbers are almost even, while in Manitoba male doctors outnumber female by 2-to-1.)

Family practice continues to get short-changed, though the picture is improving. In 2004, just 23% of medical students said they wanted to go into family practice. In 2009, that had jumped to 33%. But it needs to be 40% to meet the actual need.

And why is the need growing faster than the population? Because, of course, of the ageing of Canada. In 1921, one Canadian in 20 was aged over 65. Today, it’s one in eight. In 2026, it will hit one in five. And the “oldest old”, the 85-plus, is the fastest-growing group of all. Consumption of healthcare is astronomically higher in these age brackets. We’re not out of the woods yet.
Owen Dyer