Why You Shouldn’t Mix Alcohol with Metronidazole Pills

Many times we are told by our doctors not to combine certain medicines with other drugs and chemicals due to its potential side effects and drug interactions. Before you are prescribed with certain medicines by your doctor, you should be well aware of the precautions as well as how the medications will function so that you will know what to expect. Generally this is part of the patient safety rules. That is why you will find a leaflet packed together with the medicines you have bought so you can have something to glance on during your treatment. Leaflets contain the general instructions, precautions, the general dos and don’ts, as well as a brief list of drugs or chemical that you should never combine with your medication.

Metronidazole pills are antibacterial drugs with its sole purpose to kill and eliminate infections caused by various types of bacteria and parasites. Most of these infections can occur in the digestive tract, genital area, lungs, and other internal organs. With metronidazole pills it is easier to eliminate such body intruders by simply killing the pathogens and parasites and prevent them from coming back.

Although Metronidazole pills are very powerful and beneficial antibiotic, take note that it is still a drug that might have some drawbacks especially when taken together with other chemicals and drugs. That is why you need to discuss with your doctor about your treatment prior of taking Metronidazole pills. Among the most prohibited chemicals that you should never ingest with metronidazole is alcohol. So what makes Metronidazole pills and alcohol a dangerous combo? Read more…

Minister Matthews wouldn't "...call them kickbacks…but there are people who would."


"Allowances" given Ontario to pharmacists by generic drug companies are to be eliminated said the province's health minister Deb Matthews on Wednesday.

The idea is that the annual $750 million "subsidy" is to be used to pay for services to patients but even the pharmacists concede that 70% of the money is treated as rebates to fund operations and hike profits. Ms Matthews suggests ending the practice could reduce the cost of generics by half. To compensate, the minister suggested that the government will increase dispensing fees by $1 -- to a total of $150 million to offset the reduction.

Donnie Edwards, a pharmacist in Ridgeway, Ontario thinks not:

"When you take $3 out and put $1 back in... I don't think so. These dollars were used for professional services that pharmacists do everyday, in every town in this provinces"

Research based pharmaceutical companies support the change. Russell Williams, president of Rx&D, the companies' association, said: "As partners in the health care system, we want to work with the government and health care providers to ensure that patients have access to the most appropriate treatment… through timely access to innovative medicines and vaccines… ."

(For more go to )



iPad: Elegant. Fun. Seductive. Frustrating. Coming to Canada April 23




I've tested the new iPad and found it irresistible.The touch screen is marvellous to use. Smooth as butter (wipe after using), intuitive as your fingers, clear bright images. Fast, very fast.

Out of the box, there's not much to it -- looks like a big iTouch. There's a USB cord to plug it into a computer and that's it. Once you'd done that and downloaded the most recent version of iTunes, you're good to go.

The first impression is that it really is just a big, version of the iTouch -- with a book store. This is clearly Apple's challenge to e-books, Kindle, Sony, the Nook and all those yet to come. To get you started, there's a free copy of Winnie-the-Pooh which looks just about as good sitting on it's virtual wooden book shelf as it did when you were six years old and were given a fresh copy by your Grannie. Take it down an give it a flip thru, you won't be disappointed. The coloured pictures are lush, the type crystal clear.

The iTunes store offers a stack of new apps for the iPad from the games to the Wall Street Journal. The latter opens instantly and gives you a pared down version of the paper, like the NYTimes, it's free. There's music and movies to sample, buy or rent, e-mail, a calendar, contacts, notes, maps and YouTube.

Using the device for work is not quite as easy. You'll want to buy the wireless keybaord for starters. Then, you have to download iWork which consists of a word processor, a spreadsheet and presentation software. Each cost $9.99 US. You can e-mail your creations or upload them to the iWork website and then invite others to see them there if you and they wish. It's finicky and ties you firmly to Apple as Mr Jobs intends.

What it can't do or doesn't have: a camera, a phone, a usb connection for anything but itunes, flash video, multi-tasking, copying between programs, say, word processor to Safari, which, incidentally, is the only browser iPad uses.

What it does have: battery life of 10+ hours; the ability to mesmerize. iPad makes you wish you could use it for all your computing needs -- you can't.